Main Events

Thursday, May 9, 2019 - 5:00pm


On Thursday, May 9th we will be hosting a game night in store for you to test our tabletop games. From 5:00-8:00pm we will have games available to test and staff on hand to talk to you about the games and teach you how to play. This is a free event, open to the public. For more details please call us at 231.347.1180 or email us at events@mcleanandeakin.com.

Sunday, June 9, 2019 - 10:00am


On Sunday, June 9th at 10am join us for a Llama Party with the creators of Llama Destroys the World, Jonathan Stutzman and Heather Fox. This is a free kids event, perfect for ages 4-7years old. Reservations are requested, to RSVP please let us know by phone at 231.347.1180, email at events@mcleanandeakin.com, or through Facebook or Eventbrite. 

Meet Llama, the next great picture-book megastar, who has most definitely driven a bus and who loves tacos way more than you.

He also loves cake, and that’s where our story begins.

On Monday, Llama discovers a pile of cake, which he promptly eats.
On Tuesday, Llama squeezes into his dancing pants, which he promptly rips.
The force of the rip creates a black hole (naturally).
By Friday, Llama will (indirectly) destroy the world.

In their debut picture book, author/illustrator team Jonathan Stutzman and Heather Fox introduce young readers to the comical, the studious, the oblivious Llama, a picture-book hero for the ages. So grab some cake and your dancing pants and prepare for Llama Destroys the World... because THE TIME FOR LLAMA IS NIGH!

Jonathan Stutzman is an award-winning filmmaker and picture book author. His short films have screened at film festivals all over the world and on television, and he also has writing credits on Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s Emmy-winning variety show HitRECordOnTv (Pivot). Jonathan is a contributing writer to HitRECord’s best-selling collection The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories (Vol 1-3). He received his masters at Temple University for Film & Digital Media. He also likes Chinese food a lot.
jonathanstutzman.com

Heather Fox is an illustrator and graphic designer living in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, creating art in various mediums including pen and ink, digital, and gouache. Her art is filled with large quantities of quirk and dashes of whimsy, and she is very passionate about illustrating children's books and traveling the world.
adoodlefox.com
Fox's books for children include The Elephant's Nose and Llama Destroys the World.

Tuesday, June 11, 2019 - 12:00pm


Join us for lunch with Dorothea Benton Frank in the Perry Hotel's Rose Room on Tuesday, June 11th at noon to learn all about her newest book, Queen Bee. This is a ticketed event. Tickets are $25.00 and come with lunch. To purchase tickets visit us in store, call us at 231.347.1180 or purchase them through our website. Please direct any questions to events@mcleanandeakin.com.


“If I could only read one writer from now until the end of my life, it would be Dorothea Benton Frank." —Elin Hildebrand, the New York Times bestselling author

Immerse yourself in the enchanting world of New York Times bestselling author Dorothea Benton Frank’s Carolina Lowcountry in this evocative tale that returns at long last to her beloved Sullivan’s Island. 

Beekeeper Holly McNee Kensen quietly lives in a world of her own on Sullivan’s Island, tending her hives and working at the local island library. Holly calls her mother The Queen Bee because she’s a demanding hulk of a woman. Her mother, a devoted hypochondriac, might be unaware that she’s quite ill but that doesn’t stop her from tormenting Holly. To escape the drama, Holly’s sister Leslie married and moved away, wanting little to do with island life. Holly’s escape is to submerge herself in the lives of the two young boys next door and their widowed father, Archie.

Her world is upended when the more flamboyant Leslie returns and both sisters, polar opposites, fixate on what’s happening in their neighbor’s home. Is Archie really in love with that awful ice queen of a woman? If Archie marries her, what will become of his little boys? Restless Leslie is desperate for validation after her imploded marriage, squandering her favors on any and all takers. Their mother ups her game in an uproarious and theatrical downward spiral. Scandalized Holly is talking to her honey bees a mile a minute, as though they’ll give her a solution to all the chaos. Maybe they will.

Queen Bee is a classic Lowcountry Tale—warm, wise and hilarious, it roars with humanity and a dropperful of whodunit added for good measure by an unseen hand. In her twentieth novel, Dorothea Benton Frank brings us back to her beloved island with an unforgettable story where the Lowcountry magic of the natural world collides with the beat of the human heart.

New York Times bestselling author Dorothea Benton Frank was born and raised on Sullivan's Island, South Carolina. She resides in the New York area with her husband.

Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 6:00pm


Join us for an evening wine and cheese event with Dianna Stampfler on Wednesday, June 12th at 6pm to discuss her book, Michigan's Haunted Lighthouses. This is a free even though reservations are requested. To RSVP please call us at 231.347.1180, email us at events@mcleanandeakin.com or through Facebook or Eventbrite.
Michigan has more lighthouses than any other state, with more than 120 dotting its expansive Great Lakes shoreline. Many of these lighthouses lay claim to haunted happenings. Former keepers like the cigar-smoking Captain Townshend at Seul Choix Point and prankster John Herman at Waugoshance Shoal near Mackinaw City maintain their watch long after death ended their duties. At White River Light Station in Whitehall, Sarah Robinson still keeps a clean and tidy house, and a mysterious young girl at the Marquette Harbor Lighthouse seeks out other children and female companions. Countless spirits remain between Whitefish Point and Point Iroquois in an area well known for its many tragic shipwrecks. Join author and Promote Michigan founder Dianna Stampfler as she recounts the tales from Michigan's ghostly beacons. 

Dianna Stampfler has worked in Michigan’s tourism industry for more than twenty years. In 2004, she launched Promote Michigan, a public relations consulting company specializing in the hospitality, tourism, agriculture, culinary, natural resources, recreation, history and culture industries around her home state. Dianna has penned countless articles for publications such as Pure Michigan Travel Ideas, Michigan Blue Magazine, Michigan Home & Lifestyle Magazine, Women’s Lifestyle, AAA Living, West Michigan Carefree Travel, Lake Michigan Circle Tour & Lighthouse Guide and many others. Michigan’s Haunted Lighthouses is her first (but hopefully not her last) book.
 

Saturday, June 15, 2019 - 10:00am


On Saturday, June 15th at 10:00am we will be welcoming Natalie Ziarnik to the store to discuss her book, A Lullaby of Summer Things. This is a free children's event best suited to children ages 4-8 years old. There will be a reading followed by a craft designed by the author to go with the book. Reservations are requested, please RSVP by calling 231.347.1180 or emailing events@mcleanandeakin.com. 

In the spirit of such bedtime favorites as Emily Winfield Martin's Day Dreamers, here is a quintessential end-of-day by the beach lovingly captured and perfect for reading aloud.

This simple, lyrical picture book is as warm, reassuring, and filled with joy as a vacation at the beach. Readers will join a little girl and her siblings as they wind down from a perfect day--hanging up towels, eating dinner, and getting ready for bed--each activity sparking a memory of their day--playing catch with the dog, chasing waves, and looking at sailboats along the shore. And when the lights of the family beach house go off--"In the dusky evening light, a sleepy house says goodnight"--young listeners will be lulled to sleep themselves.

In addition to writing, Natalie Ziarnik works as a children's librarian. She lives with her family in Barrington, Illinois, which is much too far away from the ocean. Learn more about her at natalieziarnik.com and on Twitter at @NatalieZiarnik.

Madeline Valentine is the author-illustrator of three books: George in the Dark, The Bad Birthday Idea, and, most recently, I Want That Nut! A graduate of Pratt Institute, she lives in Queens, New York, with her husband. Learn more about her at madelinevalentine.com and on Twitter at @illustrated_gal.
 

Thursday, June 20, 2019 - 2:00pm


Stop in on Thursday, June 20th from 2:00-4:00pm to meet Allie Maldonado and to get your copy of Tough Cases signed. This is a free in-store book signing. 


A rare and illuminating view of how judges decide dramatic legal cases--Law and Order from behind the bench--including the Eli n Gonz lez, Terri Schiavo, and Scooter Libby cases

Prosecutors and defense attorneys have it easy--all they have to do is to present the evidence and make arguments. It's the judges who have the heavy lift: they are the ones who have to make the ultimate decisions, many of which have profound consequences on the lives of the people standing in front of them.

In Tough Cases, judges from different kinds of courts in different parts of the country write about the case that proved most difficult for them to decide. Some of these cases received international attention: the Eli n Gonz lez case in which Judge Jennifer Bailey had to decide whether to return a seven-year-old boy to his father in Cuba after his mother drowned trying to bring the child to the United States, or the Terri Schiavo case in which Judge George Greer had to decide whether to withdraw life support from a woman in a vegetative state over the wishes of her parents, or the Scooter Libby case about appropriate consequences for revealing the name of a CIA agent. Others are less well-known but equally fascinating: a judge on a Native American court trying to balance U.S. law with tribal law, a young Korean American former defense attorney struggling to adapt to her new responsibilities on the other side of the bench, and the difficult decisions faced by a judge tasked with assessing the mental health of a woman who has killed her own children.

Relatively few judges have publicly shared the thought processes behind their decision making. Tough Cases makes for fascinating reading for everyone from armchair attorneys and fans of Law and Order to those actively involved in the legal profession who want insight into the people judging their work.

Honorable Allie Greenleaf Maldonado is a citizen of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians (LTBB).  She was appointed the Chief Judge of the LTBB Tribal Court in 2012.  In 2014, Judge Maldonado was voted Michigan Lawyer’s Weekly Woman of the Year and Co-Chair of the first Tribal State Federal Judicial Forum.

Judge Maldonado is a nationally-recognized expert on the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) and the Michigan Indian Family Preservation Act (MIFPA). She has worked extensively with the State Court Administrative Office to bring Michigan into compliance with ICWA, and is a frequent trainer and speaker in the areas of ICWA and MIFPA.
 

Sunday, June 23, 2019 - 3:00pm


Join us on Sunday, June 23rd at 3pm for a '60s inspired afternoon with Elin Hilderbrand to celebrate her latest novel, The Summer of '69. This is a free event though reservations are requested. To RSVP please call us at 231.347.1180, email us at events@mcleanandeakin.com, or let us know on Facebook or Eventbrite. We will be featuring an assortment of '60s and '70s appetizers and a signature cocktail, be sure to arrive a little early to grab some snacks!

Four siblings experience the drama, intrigue, and upheaval of a summer when everything changed, in New York Times bestselling author Elin Hilderbrand's first historical novel

Welcome to the most tumultuous summer of the twentieth century. It's 1969, and for the Levin family, the times they are a-changing. Every year the children have looked forward to spending the summer at their grandmother's historic home in downtown Nantucket. But like so much else in America, nothing is the same: Blair, the oldest sister, is marooned in Boston, pregnant with twins and unable to travel. Middle sister Kirby, caught up in the thrilling vortex of civil rights protests and determined to be independent, takes a summer job on Martha's Vineyard. Only-son Tiger is an infantry soldier, recently deployed to Vietnam. Thirteen-year-old Jessie suddenly feels like an only child, marooned in the house with her out-of-touch grandmother and her worried mother, each of them hiding a troubling secret. As the summer heats up, Ted Kennedy sinks a car in Chappaquiddick, man flies to the moon, and Jessie and her family experience their own dramatic upheavals along with the rest of the country. 

In her first historical novel, rich with the details of an era that shaped both a nation and an island thirty miles out to sea, Elin Hilderbrand once again earns her title as queen of the summer novel.

Elin Hilderbrand was born on July 17, 1969 in Boston, Massachusetts. She has used her 50 years to write 23 novels and raise three children on Nantucket Island.

Friday, June 28, 2019 - 2:00pm


Mark Stormzand will be signing copies of his book, "Stormy Outside", in the store on Friday, June 28th from 2-4pm. This is a free signing. 
A compilation of escapades and adventures of a forester and his various canine companions. The stories cover the decades between 1975 and 2015, stretching from Idaho to Maine. Often hilarious and always a good lesson learned, this memoir is heartwarming and full of life knowledge gained from the perspective of a career working in the great outdoors.

With little knowledge of the life of a forester, Mark Stormzand pursued that career based on one assumption: Forests were outside, and that’s where he wanted to be. After graduation from Michigan State University in 1976, with forestry diploma in hand, he and his new bride headed into the wilds to see what life had to offer. Idaho, New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, Michigan, and

Ontario became the author’s workplace and playground. Northern Michigan eventually became home, where children were raised and many life lessons learned. One of those lessons was, “A dog is the only thing on earth that loves you more than she loves herself.”

Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - 2:00pm


Stop in on Tuesday, July 9th between 2:00 and 4:00pm for a signing with local author, Mary Agria. Mary will be in signing copies of her latest novel, Range of Motion. This is a free signing. 

Author of the best-selling novel, Time in a Garden, Mary Agria continues her love affair with northern Michigan and gardens. In this novel about the power of new beginnings—as long-time Little Traverse Bay cottager Maggie Aron struggles to confront her own mortality and the ’sciatica of the soul’ that can rob life of its meaning and hope. 

“Plants root themselves. […] Except life doesn’t end there. They grow toward one another, sharing space, building the community we call a garden. Plants stretch upward toward the sun. They dance on the wind. We can learn a lot from plants.” Range of Motion

RANGE OF MOTION offers powerful insights into the nature of community and the resilience it takes to keep growing no matter what the future holds. Author Mary Agria was featured Michigan woman author of the year by the Charlevoix Zonta (2016) and won first prize in the statewide feature competition from Michigan Garden Clubs (2017). Five of her eight novels celebrate the unique beauty and culture of northern Michigan.

Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - 6:00pm


Victoria Johnson will be joining us on Tuesday, July 9th to discuss her book, American Eden. This is a free wine and cheese event and reservation are requested. To RSVP please call us at 231.347.1180, email us at events@mcleanandeakin.com or via Facebook or Eventbrite. 

On a clear morning in July 1804, Alexander Hamilton stepped onto a boat at the edge of the Hudson River. He was bound for a New Jersey dueling ground to settle his bitter dispute with Aaron Burr. Hamilton took just two men with him: his "second" for the duel, and Dr. David Hosack.

As historian Victoria Johnson reveals in her groundbreaking biography, Hosack was one of the few points the duelists did agree on. Summoned that morning because of his role as the beloved Hamilton family doctor, he was also a close friend of Burr. A brilliant surgeon and a world-class botanist, Hosack--who until now has been lost in the fog of history--was a pioneering thinker who shaped a young nation.

Born in New York City, he was educated in Europe and returned to America inspired by his newfound knowledge. He assembled a plant collection so spectacular and diverse that it amazes botanists today, conducted some of the first pharmaceutical research in the United States, and introduced new surgeries to American. His tireless work championing public health and science earned him national fame and praise from the likes of Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Alexander von Humboldt, and the Marquis de Lafayette.

One goal drove Hosack above all others: to build the Republic's first botanical garden. Despite innumerable obstacles and near-constant resistance, Hosack triumphed when, by 1810, his Elgin Botanic Garden at last crowned twenty acres of Manhattan farmland. "Where others saw real estate and power, Hosack saw the landscape as a pharmacopoeia able to bring medicine into the modern age" (Eric W. Sanderson, author of Mannahatta). Today what remains of America's first botanical garden lies in the heart of midtown, buried beneath Rockefeller Center.

Whether collecting specimens along the banks of the Hudson River, lecturing before a class of rapt medical students, or breaking the fever of a young Philip Hamilton, David Hosack was an American visionary who has been too long forgotten. Alongside other towering figures of the post-Revolutionary generation, he took the reins of a nation. In unearthing the dramatic story of his life, Johnson offers a lush depiction of the man who gave a new voice to the powers and perils of nature.

Victoria Johnson is Associate Professor of Urban Policy and Planning at Hunter College of the City University of New York, where she teaches on nonprofits, arts management, and the history of New York City. She earned an undergraduate degree in philosophy from Yale in 1991 and a Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia in 2002. Before joining Hunter College in 2015, she taught at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor for thirteen years. Check out her beautiful website here at www.americaneden.org 


 

Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - 2:00pm


Aaron Stander will be in the store signing copies of his latest Ray Elkins Thriller, The Center Cannot Hold, on Wednesday, July 10th from 2:00-4:00pm. This is a free signing. 

In the depths of winter, Cedar County is on occasion literally frozen in place. Roads are impassable; the area schools are closed for days at a time. And the bad guys and gals, they're hunkered down like everyone else until the weather breaks. But this winter isn't the usual. There's arson and murder. The iniquities of some particularly unsavory ancestors are being visited upon the current generation.

AARON STANDER spent most of his adult years in the Detroit area, where he taught English and trained writing teachers. In 2000 he and his wife left college teaching positions and moved permanently to their cottage near Traverse City.

He is also the author of numerous articles, stories, poems, and reviews, and the host of Michigan Writers on the Air  on Interlochen Public Radio. When not writing or thinking about writing, Aaron spends a lot of time in his kayak.

Friday, July 12, 2019 - 2:00pm


On Friday, July 12th from 2-4pm Vincent Reusch will be in the store signing copies of his book, THE MERCURIAL SCIENCE OF THE HUMAN HEART. This is a free signing.

Fiction. Short Stories. "Vincent Reusch is a magician, and the stories in THE MERCURIAL SCIENCE OF THE HUMAN HEART are like so many rabbits pulled from a hat. At once gorgeously written and enormously felt, they're the kind of stories that remind us how vulnerable we are to the vagaries of love and loss. Sometimes hilarious and sometimes melancholy, Reusch is never anything less than exactly right about who we are. I already can't wait for more from this exciting new voice."—Peter Geye 

Vincent Reusch's fiction has appeared in a number of national literary journals including Gettysburg Review, Madison Review, and Alaska Quarterly Review. His work has also been recognized in a number of contests including the DANA Award Portfolio Contest and the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award. He lives with his wife and son in Minnesota, where he teaches and practices the art of writing.

Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - 2:00pm


We are thrilled to welcome Wade Rouse back for an event on Wednesday, July 17th at 2pm at The Perry Hotel's Rose Garden Veranda. This is a ticketed event which includes a drink ticket and snacks, tickets are $15. Wade will be talking about his latest Viola Shipman novel, The Summer Cottage, at this cozy afternoon event. Tickets are limited so get them before they are gone. To purchase tickets please give us a call at 231.347.1180, check out our website at www.mcleanandeakin.com or come talk to us in person at the store. 

Advance Praise for THE SUMMER COTTAGE "Every now and then a new voice in fiction arrives to completely charm, entertain and remind us what matters. Viola Shipman is that voice and The Summer Cottage is that absolutely irresistible and necessary novel." -- New York Times  Bestselling Author Dorothea Benton Frank

From the bestselling author of The Charm Bracelet and The Recipe Box comes the perfect summer escape about the restorative power of family tradition, small-town community and the feel of sand between your toes.

Adie Lou Kruger's ex never understood her affection for what her parents called their Cozy Cottage, the charming, ramshackle summer home--complete with its own set of rules for relaxing--that she's inherited on Lake Michigan. But despite the fact she's facing a broken marriage and empty nest, and middle age is looming in the distance, memories of happy childhoods on the beach give her reason for hope. She's determined not to let her husband's affair with a grad student reduce her to a clich , or to waste one more minute in a career she doesn't love, so it becomes clear what Adie Lou must do: rebuild her life and restore her cottage shingle by shingle, on her terms.But converting the beloved, weather-beaten structure into a bed-and-breakfast isn't quite the efficient home-reno experience she's seen on TV. Pushback from Saugatuck's contentious preservation society, costly surprises and demanding guests were not part of the plan. But as the cottage comes back to life, Adie Lou does, too, finding support in unexpected places and a new love story on the horizon. One cottage rule at a time, Adie Lou reclaims her own strength, history and joy by rediscovering the magic in every sunset and sandcastle. 

VIOLA SHIPMAN is a pen name for Wade Rouse, a popular, award-winning memoirist. Rouse chose his grandmother’s name, Viola Shipman, to honor the woman whose charm bracelet and family stories inspired him to write his debut novel, which is a tribute to all of our elders. Rouse lives in Michigan and writes regularly for People and Coastal Living, among other places, and is a contributor to All Things Considered. To date, The Charm Bracelet has been translated into nine languages. He is at work on his next “heirloom novel.”

Thursday, July 18, 2019 - 2:00pm


On Thursday, July 18th from 2:00-4:00pm Dean Feldpausch will be in the store signing copies of his book, The Batman and the Ballerina: The Amazing Life and Love of Clem Sohn and Margot Fonteyn. This is a free signing event. 

The greatest aerial batman was Clement Sohn. He embodied the daring life, which prevailed in the early aviators in American history. He will always be the greatest Batman of all times.
One of the greatest ballerinas the world has ever known was Margot Fonteyn. She embodied the ultimate in ballet excellence. 

Dean R. Feldpausch was born in Michigan in September of 1955. He is married to Marcia, and has three daughters; Kendall, Gwen, and Laura. 

He has held job positions in housing construction, tax auditing, and IT management, for several companies in Michigan. Dean earned a bachelor’s degree from Northwood University, and a master’s degree from Central Michigan University.

Dean was a wedding singer for many years, and has performed in over twenty stage productions with local theater groups. The Batman and the Ballerina is his first published literary work.
 

Thursday, July 18, 2019 - 6:00pm


Andrew Lawler will be joining us for a Wine and Cheese Reception on Thursday, July 18th at 6pm to discuss his book, The Secret Token: Myth, Obsession, and the Search for the Lost Colony of Roanoke. This is a free event though reservations are requested. To RSVP please call us at 231.347.1180, email us at events@mcleanandeakin.com or through Facebook or Eventbrite. 

 

A sweeping account of America's oldest unsolved mystery, the people racing to unearth its answer, and the sobering truths--about race, gender, and immigration--exposed by the Lost Colony of Roanoke


In 1587, 115 men, women, and children arrived at Roanoke Island on the coast of North Carolina. Chartered by Queen Elizabeth I, their colony was to establish England's first foothold in the New World. But when the colony's leader, John White, returned to Roanoke from a resupply mission, his settlers were nowhere to be found. They left behind only a single clue--a "secret token" carved into a tree. Neither White nor any other European laid eyes on the colonists again.

What happened to the Lost Colony of Roanoke? For four hundred years, that question has consumed historians and amateur sleuths, leading only to dead ends and hoaxes. But after a chance encounter with a British archaeologist, journalist Andrew Lawler discovered that solid answers to the mystery were within reach. He set out to unravel the enigma of the lost settlers, accompanying competing researchers, each hoping to be the first to solve its riddle. In the course of his journey, Lawler encounters a host of characters obsessed with the colonists and their fate, and he determines why the Lost Colony continues to haunt our national consciousness.
 

Thrilling and absorbing, The Secret Token offers a new understanding not just of the first English settlement in the New World but of how its disappearance continues to define--and divide--America. 

 

ANDREW LAWLER is the author of the highly acclaimed Why Did the Chicken Cross the World?. He is a contributing writer for Science, a contributing editor for Archaeology Magazine, and has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian, and Slate.

Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 6:00pm


We are thrilled to have Stephen Mack Jones back to McLean & Eakin for his latest book, Lives Laid Away, on Wednesday, July 24th at 6pm. This is a free wine and cheese event, reservations are requested. To RSVP please call us at 231.347.1180, email us at events@mcleanandeakin.com or through Facebook or Eventbrite. 

Detroit ex-cop August Snow takes up vigilante justice when his beloved neighborhood of Mexicantown is caught in the crosshairs of a human trafficking scheme.

When the body of an unidentified young Hispanic woman dressed as Queen Marie Antoinette is dredged from the Detroit River, the Detroit Police Department wants the case closed fast. Wayne County Coroner Bobby Falconi gives the woman’s photo to his old pal ex-police detective August Snow, insisting August show it around his native Mexicantown to see if anyone recognizes her. August’s good friend Elena, a prominent advocate for undocumented immigrants, recognizes the woman immediately as a local teenager, Isadora del Torres.

Izzy’s story is one the authorities don’t want getting around—and she’s not the only young woman to have disappeared during an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raid, only to turn up dead a few weeks later. Preyed upon by the law itself, the people of Mexicantown have no one to turn to. August Snow, the son of an African-American cop and a Mexican-American painter, will not sit by and watch his neighbors suffer in silence. In a guns-blazing wild ride across Detroit, from its neo-Nazi biker hole-ups to its hip-hop recording studios, its swanky social clubs to its seedy nightclubs, August puts his own life on the line to protect the community he loves. 

Stephen Mack Jones is a published poet, an award-winning playwright, and a recipient of the prestigious Hammett Prize, the Nero Award, and the Kresge Arts in Detroit Literary Fellowship. He was born in Lansing, Michigan, and currently lives in the suburbs of Detroit. He worked in advertising and marketing communications for a number of years before turning to fiction. August Snow was his first novel.

Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 6:00pm


Katherine Reay will be in the store on Tuesday, July 30th at 6pm to discuss her latest book, The Printed Letter Bookshop. This is a free wine and cheese event, reservations are requested. To RSVP please call us at 231.347.1180, email at events@mcleanandeakin.com, or through Facebook or Eventbrite. 

"Powerful, enchanting, and spirited, this novel will delight." -Patti Callahan Henry, bestselling author of Becoming Mrs. Lewis

Love, friendship, and family find a home at the Printed Letter Bookshop

One of Madeline Cullen's happiest childhood memories is of working with her Aunt Maddie in the quaint and cozy Printed Letter Bookshop. But by the time Madeline inherits the shop nearly twenty years later, family troubles and her own bitter losses have hardened Madeline's heart toward her once-treasured aunt--and the now struggling bookshop left in her care.

While Madeline intends to sell the shop as quickly as possible, the Printed Letter's two employees have other ideas. Reeling from a recent divorce, Janet finds sanctuary within the books and within the decadent window displays she creates. Claire, though quieter than the acerbic Janet, feels equally drawn to the daily rhythms of the shop and its loyal clientele, finding a renewed purpose within its walls. When Madeline's professional life takes an unexpected turn, and when a handsome gardener upends all her preconceived notions, she questions her plans and her heart. She begins to envision a new path for herself and for her aunt's beloved shop--provided the women's best combined efforts are not too little, too late.

The Printed Letter Bookshop is a captivating story of good books, a testament to the beauty of new beginnings, and a sweet reminder of the power of friendship.

 Katherine Reay is a national bestselling and award-winning author of several novels, including Dear Mr. Knightley and the upcoming The Printed Letter Bookshop. She has enjoyed a lifelong affair with books and brings that love to her contemporary stories. Her first full-length nonfiction work will release in December 2019. Katherine holds a BA and MS from Northwestern University. She currently writes full time and lives outside Chicago, IL with her husband and three children. You can meet Katherine at www.katherinereay.com or on Facebook: KatherineReayBooks, Twitter: @katherine_reay and Instagram:@katherinereay.   

Wednesday, July 31, 2019 - 6:00pm


On Wednesday, July 31st at 6pm we will be welcoming John Smolens to the store to discuss his latest novel, Out. This is a free wine and cheese event, reservations are requested. To RSVP please call us at 231.347.1180, email us at events@mcleanandeakin.com or reserve online through Facebook or Eventbrite. 

Out, the sequel to John Smolens’s internationally acclaimed novel Cold, finds the former constable Del Maki recovering from surgery and haunted by the recent loss of his wife. His house, set deep in the woods of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, becomes a haven for refugees during a fierce blizzard. First his pregnant physical therapist’s car won’t start. Then her two lovers come for her—and after each other. After her current boyfriend saves an enigmatic Finnish woman from freezing to death in the storm, they are followed by her former boyfriend, a petty thief who is armed and seeks revenge. As the weather worsens, leading to a power outage, damage from a fallen tree, and a fire, tensions rise. Forced to abandon the house, their flight through the snowbound forest leads to a bad deal with a deadly result. John Smolens’s novel Cold was lauded for its “stunning brutality and uncommon tenderness.” In the sequel, Out, nature and human nature again collide, illuminating the difference between being rescued and being saved.

John Smolens has published ten works of fiction, most recently Wolf’s Mouth, which has been selected as a Library of Michigan Notable Book. In 2010 he was the recipient of the Michigan Author of the Year Award from the Michigan Library Association

Thursday, August 1, 2019 - 6:00pm


 Anna Clark will be joining us on Thursday, August 1st to discuss her book, The Poisoned City. This will be a free in-store event though reservations are requested. To RSVP please call us at 231.347.1180 or email us at events@mcleanandeakin.com. 


When the people of Flint, Michigan, turned on their faucets in April 2014, the water pouring out was poisoned with lead and other toxins.

Through a series of disastrous decisions, the state government had switched the city’s water supply to a source that corroded Flint’s aging lead pipes. Complaints about the foul-smelling water were dismissed: the residents of Flint, mostly poor and African American, were not seen as credible, even in matters of their own lives.

It took eighteen months of activism by city residents and a band of dogged outsiders to force the state to admit that the water was poisonous. By that time, twelve people had died and Flint’s children had suffered irreparable harm. The long battle for accountability and a humane response to this man-made disaster has only just begun.

In the first full account of this American tragedy, Anna Clark's The Poisoned City recounts the gripping story of Flint’s poisoned water through the people who caused it, suffered from it, and exposed it. It is a chronicle of one town, but could also be about any American city, all made precarious by the neglect of infrastructure and the erosion of democratic decision making. Places like Flint are set up to fail—and for the people who live and work in them, the consequences can be fatal.

Anna Clark is a journalist living in Detroit. Her writing has appeared in ELLE Magazine, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Politico, the Columbia Journalism Review, Next City, and other publications. Anna edited A Detroit Anthology, a Michigan Notable Book, and she had been a writer-in-residence in Detroit public schools as part of the InsideOut Literary Arts program. She has also been a Fulbright fellow in Nairobi, Kenya, and a Knight-Wallace journalism fellow at the University of Michigan. Her books include The Poisoned City and Literary Luminaries.  

Wednesday, August 7, 2019 - 2:00pm


On  Wednesday, August 7th from 2-4pm Peter Marabell will be in the store signing copies of his latest book, The Final Act of Conrad North. This is a free signing.

  

“Conrad North is a murderer,” the caller said. “People are dead because of him.”

It had been two years since Conrad North got away with murder. Two years. The cops didn’t put him away for Camille North, the prosecutors didn’t make the case, but Michael Russo still thinks he’s responsible for a killer being on the loose.  

Then one day, like a ghost from the past, a phone call; “This is Patricia Geary,” the caller said to Russo. “Conrad North killed Annie, too. I want you to get him for it.”
Suddenly, the two years vanished. Russo takes the case and accepts the daunting task of helping to bring a killer to justice. He chases the elusive Conrad North from Petoskey to Harbor Springs, Gaylord and the streets of Traverse City.
“Conrad’s a smart man,” AJ reminds him. “He beat all of you last time. This is personal for you. What if Conrad beats you this time, too?”
Second chances don’t come easily or often. Russo understands the risks because it’s his chance to clear his conscience and put a murderer behind bars.

      

Peter Marabell grew up in metro Detroit, spending as much time as possible street-racing on Woodward Avenue in the 1950s or visiting the Straits of Mackinac. With a Ph.D. in History and Politics, Peter spent most of his professional career on the faculty at Michigan State University. He is the author of Frederick Libby and the American Peace Movement. His first novel, More Than a Body, was published in 2013. As a freelance writer, Peter worked in several professional fields including politics, the arts, and health care. In 2002, Peter moved permanently to Northern Michigan with his spouse and business partner, Frances Barger, to live, write and work at their businesses on Mackinac Island. All things considered, he would rather obsess about American politics, or Spartan basketball, after a good five-mile run on the hills of Mackinac Island.

Wednesday, August 7, 2019 - 6:00pm


Join us on Wednesday, August 7th at 6:00pm for a wine and cheese event with David L. Roll for his latest book, George Marshall: Defender of the Republic. This is a free event, reservations are requested. 

The extraordinary career of George Catlett Marshall—America’s most distinguished soldier–statesman since George Washington—whose selfless leadership and moral character influenced the course of two world wars and helped define the American century. 
Winston Churchill called him World War II's "organizer of victory." Harry Truman said he was "the greatest military man that this country ever produced." Today, in our era of failed leadership, few lives are more worthy of renewed examination than Marshall and his fifty years of loyal service to the defense of his nation and its values. 

Even as a young officer he was heralded as a genius, a reputation that grew when in WWI he planned and executed a nighttime movement of more than a half million troops from one battlefield to another that led to the armistice. Between the wars he helped modernize combat training, and re-staffed the U.S. Army's officer corps with the men who would lead in the next decades. But as WWII loomed, it was the role of army chief of staff in which Marshall's intellect and backbone were put to the test, when his blind commitment to duty would run up against the realities of Washington politics. Long seen as a stoic, almost statuesque figure, he emerges in these pages as a man both remarkable and deeply human, thanks to newly discovered sources.

Set against the backdrop of five major conflicts—two world wars, Palestine, Korea, and the Cold War—Marshall's education in military, diplomatic, and political power, replete with their nuances and ambiguities, runs parallel with America's emergence as a global superpower. The result is a defining account of one of our most consequential leaders. 

David L. Roll is the author of The Hopkins Touch: Harry Hopkins and the Forging of the Alliance to Defeat Hitler and the coauthor of Louis Johnson and the Arming of America, a biography of Harry Truman’s defense secretary. A partner at Steptoe & Johnson LLP and founder of the Lex Mundi Pro Bono Foundation, a public interest organization that provides pro bono legal services to social entrepreneurs around the world, he lives in Washington, DC.

Thursday, August 8, 2019 - 6:00pm


Join us for an event at Petoskey's Crooked Tree Auditorium with Terry Gamble to discuss her latest novel, The Eulogist, on Thursday, August 8th at 6:00pm. This is a free event though reservations are requested. To RSVP please call us at 231.347.1180 or email us at event@mcleanandeakin.com. 
From the author of The Water Dancers and Good Family, an exquisitely crafted novel, set in Ohio in the decades leading to the Civil War, that illuminates the immigrant experience, the injustice of slavery, and the debts human beings owe to one another, witnessed through the endeavors of one Irish-American family.

Cheated out of their family estate in Northern Ireland after the Napoleonic Wars, the Givens family arrives in America in 1819. But in coming to this new land, they have lost nearly everything. Making their way west they settle in Cincinnati, a burgeoning town on the banks of the mighty Ohio River whose rise, like the Givenses’ own, will be fashioned by the colliding forces of Jacksonian populism, religious evangelism, industrial capitalism, and the struggle for emancipation.

After losing their mother in childbirth and their father to a riverboat headed for New Orleans, James, Olivia, and Erasmus Givens must fend for themselves. Ambitious James eventually marries into a prosperous family, builds a successful business, and rises in Cincinnati society. Taken by the spirit and wanderlust, Erasmus becomes an itinerant preacher, finding passion and heartbreak as he seeks God. Independent-minded Olivia, seemingly destined for spinsterhood, enters into a surprising partnership and marriage with Silas Orpheus, a local doctor who spurns social mores.

When her husband suddenly dies from an infection, Olivia travels to his family home in Kentucky, where she meets his estranged brother and encounters the horrors of slavery firsthand. After abetting the escape of one slave, Olivia is forced to confront the status of a young woman named Tilly, another slave owned by Olivia’s brother-in-law. When her attempt to help Tilly ends in disaster, Olivia tracks down Erasmus, who has begun smuggling runaways across the river—the borderline between freedom and slavery.

As the years pass, this family of immigrants initially indifferent to slavery will actively work for its end—performing courageous, often dangerous, occasionally foolhardy acts of moral rectitude that will reverberate through their lives for generations to come.

Terry Gamble is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of Michigan. She lives in Sonoma and San Francisco, California.

Saturday, August 10, 2019 - 10:00am


Join us for a free event with Kate Hannigan for her latest book, Cape, on Saturday, August 10th at 10am. This is a free event though reservations are requested. To RSVP please call us at 231.347.1180, email us at events@mcleanandeakin.com or through Facebook or Eventbrite. 

 

Hidden Figures meets Wonder Woman in this action-packed, comic-inspired adventure about a brilliant girl puzzler who discovers she’s part of a superhero team!

Josie O’Malley does a lot to help out Mam after her father goes off to fight the Nazis, but she wishes she could do more—like all those caped heroes who now seem to have disappeared. If Josie can’t fly and control weather like her idol, Zenobia, maybe she can put her math smarts to use cracking puzzles for the government.

After an official tosses out her puzzler test because she’s a girl, it soon becomes clear that an even more top-secret agency has its eye on Josie, along with two other applicants: Akiko and Mae. The trio bonds over their shared love of female superhero celebrities, from Fantomah to Zenobia to the Black Cat. But during one extraordinary afternoon, they find themselves transformed into the newest (and youngest!) superheroes in town. As the girls’ abilities slowly begin to emerge, they learn that their skills will be crucial in thwarting a shapeshifting henchman of Hitler, and, just maybe, in solving an even larger mystery about the superheroes who’ve recently gone missing.

Inspired by remarkable real-life women from World War II—the human computers and earliest programmers called “the ENIAC Six”—this pulse-pounding adventure features bold action, brave thinking, and an empowering belief that each one of us has the stuff it takes to be a superhero.

Kate Hannigan is a noted author with a special passion for stories that empower girls and women. Her picture book biography, A Lady Has the Floor, received four starred reviews, was named a Junior Library Guild Selection, and was praised by Kirkus Reviews as “an excellent, well-researched model of its genre, which will inspire children to do whatever they desire in life, no matter what immediate restrictions exist.” In addition to the 2016 Golden Kite Award for Middle Grade Fiction, The Detective’s Assistant also received starred reviews from Kirkus Reviews and BCCB, and was a Booklist Editor’s Choice; a Bank Street College Best Children’s Book; a Nerdy Book Club award winner; an Amelia Bloomer List title; a Chicago Public Library Best Book; and a Mighty Girl Top Pick for Tweens and Teens. Hannigan recently presented at NCTE on “Our Mighty Girls,” about girl power in middle grade fiction, and was a judge for 2018’s Golden Kite Awards. Between her active presence on social media (@KateChicago), her work as founder of the Hyde Park/South Side Chicago chapter of SCBWI, and as an busy conference speaker, Kate is an involved, vocal, and respected member of the kid lit community. Visit her online at KatesBooks.com.  

Saturday, August 17, 2019 - 10:00am


Join us for a free children's event with author Patty Brozo to celebrate the release of her newest book, The Buddy Bench. The event will take place in the store on Saturday, August 17th at 10am. Please RSVP by calling us at 231.347.1180 or emailing us at events@mcleanandeakin.com. 

A school playground can be a solitary place for a kid without playmates; in one survey, 80 percent of 8- to 10-year-old respondents described being lonely at some point during a school day.

Patty Brozo's cast of kids brings a playground to raucous life, and Mike Deas's illustrations invest their games with imaginary planes to fly, dragons to tame, and elephants to ride. And these kids match their imaginations with empathy, identifying and swooping up the lonely among them.

Buddy benches are appearing in schoolyards around the country. Introduced from Germany in 2014, the concept is simple: When a child sits on the bench, it's a signal to other kids to ask him or her to play.
 

 

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